Thursday, March 26, 2015 | Washington Times (DC) | Andrea Noble

Sen. Marco Rubio, a likely Republican presidential contender in 2016, introduced legislation Thursday to roll back restrictive gun laws in the District of Columbia, arguing that congressional intervention is needed to “correct” laws that violate the Second Amendment.

Courting the guns right lobby, Mr. Rubio attacked the city’s long history of upholding prohibitions that have prevented law-abiding citizens from owning and carrying firearms.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | The Hill (DC) | Tim Devaney

The National Rifle Association (NRA) is cheering new Republican legislation that would make it easier for gun owners to obtain firearms in the nation's capitol.

The Second Amendment Enforcement Act introduced Thursday by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) would roll back many of the hurdles to gun ownership in Washington, D.C., and push back against some of the city's strict firearms laws.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | Newsmax.com | Drew MacKenzie

Potential presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio has angered Democrats in the District of Columbia by introducing a bill to reverse tough gun laws in the city.

The Florida Republican claims that the current regulations violate the Second Amendment by preventing law-abiding citizens from owning and carrying firearms, according to The Washington Times.

"For years, the District of Columbia has infringed on its residents' Second Amendment rights and rendered them vulnerable to criminals who could care less what the gun laws are," said Rubio.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | DC Vote - Press Release

Press Release

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | Washington Post (DC) | Aaron C. Davis

Two high-profile Republicans in Congress, Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) and Rep. Jim Jordan (Ohio), have introduced legislation that would undo the District’s gun laws, which are among the strictest in the nation.

If embraced by Republican leaders of the House and Senate, the legislation could force a Second Amendment showdown with President Obama just two years after he failed an attempt to win stricter gun control laws nationwide.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | CBS Miami

Senator Marco Rubio of Florida introduced a new bill that would ban local elected officials from enacting gun-control laws.

The bill introduced Thursday by Rubio would essentially leave the District of Columbia governed only by federal gun laws.

Rubio says in a statement that District leaders have infringed on residents’ second-amendment rights and left them “vulnerable to criminals.” The city requires that handguns be registered, and residents must show a reason for obtaining a concealed-carry permit.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | Associated Press News Service (AP)

A likely Republican presidential candidate has introduced a bill that would ban local elected officials in the nation’s capital from enacting gun-control laws.

The bill introduced Thursday by Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida would essentially leave the District of Columbia governed only by federal gun laws.

Rubio says in a statement that District leaders have infringed on residents’ second-amendment rights and left them “vulnerable to criminals.” The city requires that handguns be registered, and residents must show a reason for obtaining a concealed-carry permit.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | Roll Call (DC) | Bridget Bowman

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio introduced a bill Thursday aimed at loosening the District of Columbia’s gun laws.

The Republican lawmakers’ bill, titled the Second Amendment Enforcement Act of 2015, states that D.C. “remains one of the most dangerous large cities in the United States.” The text states that D.C.’s regulations prevent citizens from protecting themselves against violent crime.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | DCist.com | Matt Cohen

Because he's probably running for President and he can, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) is messing with D.C.'s gun laws. Under a bill he introduced with Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), all of D.C.'s gun laws would not only be undone, but local legislators would be restricted in their ability to pass any future laws restricting gun ownership.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 | Washington City Paper (DC) | Will Sommer

The D.C. Council won't have to provide staffers' names to a congressional committee—for now. After a fierce internal dispute over whether to name the Council staffers who worked on a pot legalization hearing, the Council has gotten away with only naming councilmembers. Those names are in a letter that could potentially double as a list of people who broke federal appropriations laws.

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